7 DISADVANTAGES OF PLANTATION AGRICULTURE

7 DISADVANTAGES OF PLANTATION AGRICULTURE




Plantation agriculture refers to commercial farming where cash crops are grown on a large scale specifically for sale.

Crops that are grown under plantation agriculture include; sugarcane, tea, sisal, coffee, pyrethrum, cloves, bananas, and oil palm.

The major plantations in East Africa include Kakira in Jinja for sugarcane, Lugazi (SCOUL) for sugarcane, Kasaku tea estate near Lugazi, Kericho tea estate, Mwea-Tebere for rice, Mumias for sugar, Kibimba (Tilda Uganda Limited) for rice, Kilombero for sugarcane and Morogoro sisal estate and Zanzibar clove estate.




The following are the Disadvantages of plantation agriculture

It encourages rural-urban migration

this may occur due to the fact that people move from rural areas to plantations area to look for jobs also rural-urban migration may occur due to displacement of people in rural areas by the establishment of plantations.

Plantation agriculture refers to commercial farming where cash crops are grown on a large scale specifically for sale

It leads to the displacement of people from their own land hence leaving many people landless.




plantation agriculture takes large areas therefore in order to establish the people in areas where plantations are established are usually relocated to other areas.

also du to the fact that plantations occupy a large area, it may cause skyrocketing land prices and a lack of land for people to farm and produce food for their families.

for example in Kericho Kenya where tea plantations are established, it is difficult to get land for other activities and the land prices are high.

plantation agriculture can lead to deforestation

in order to establish the plantation large piece of land must be cleared of its natural vegetation and this can lead to problems such as soil erosion and disturbance of the ecosystem and loss of biodiversity




for example clearing of Mabira forest by SCOUL.

The major plantations in East Africa include Kakira in Jinja for sugarcane, Lugazi (SCOUL) for sugarcane, Kasaku tea estate near Lugazi, Kericho tea estate, Mwea-Tebere for rice, Mumias for sugar, Kibimba (Tilda Uganda Limited) for rice, Kilombero for sugarcane and Morogoro sisal estate and Zanzibar clove estate.

plantation agriculture leads to soil erosion and exhaustion

Monoculture practiced by farmers on plantations leads to soil exhaustion and erosion hence loss of soil fertility.

plantation agriculture need large capital outlay

They require large capital (capital intensive) yet the majority of people in East Africa are poor leading to foreign ownership.

multiplication of pests and diseases




the practice of monoculture in plantation agriculture can lead to the multiplication of pests and diseases

profit repatriation lead to reduced money circulation in the economy

Monoculture practiced by farmers on plantations leads to soil exhaustion and erosion hence loss of soil fertility.
They require large capital (capital intensive) yet the majority of people in East Africa are poor leading to foreign ownership.
There is increased multiplication of pests and diseases due to monoculture on these plantations.

since many plantation farms especially in Africa, are owned by foreigners, there is a problem of profit repatriation where by the owners of the farms return part of their profit to their home countries.

this problem can lead to slow development of the local economy due to reduced money circulation




 Out growers are farmers adjacent to plantations who grow similar crops as those grown on plantations and they therefore sell their crops to the plantation owners

READ MORE

3 thoughts on “7 DISADVANTAGES OF PLANTATION AGRICULTURE”

  1. Pingback: Dangers of over depending on the exportation of agricultural products and their solutions

  2. Pingback: 8 advantages of plantation agriculture

  3. Pingback: 9 problems facing wetlands areas

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: